Syllabus

An on-line experience using short essay writings, group work assignments, threaded class discussions and research papers to survey photography's contribution to the visual arts in the 19th and 20th century. Course design will examine the work of individual photographers and trace the major issues that influenced their work. Discussion questions will be on various artistic styles with emphasis on exploring the parallels between aesthetic and technical development. Study of photography's relationship to other media and understanding interrelationship between photography and culture between the Renaissance and today.

Textbooks

Seizing the Light: A History of Photography, by Robert Hirsch - ISBN   0-697-14361-9
Criticizing Photographs, by Terry Barrett - ISBN   0-7674-1186-2

Requirements

Regular attendance: Attendance is measured by your work group participation in threaded discussions. 3 or more late postings or late responses in your group over the semester will reduce your grade one letter. 6 or more late postings or late responses......... drop the class! See Is this class for you for if you haven't already.

Readings and www links: All of the visual and written material that will be needed to participate in this class and threaded discussions listed as they are needed in the course outline.

This course will involve approximately 35 total pages of writing. It is estimated for every single written page the student will need to spend 4 hours of time: two hours reading material, one hour to write first draft and one hour to rewrite before the work is posted. These are general guidelines, but are offered to give students an understanding of the time commitment necessary for this 3 credit hour on-line course.

Plan on spending 7 to 10 hours a week to fulfill the requirements for this 16 week spring internet course. Students will submit written documents on-line in three distinct ways: submission of weekly essay topics in discussion groups, posting responses to topics in work groups and writing two research papers submitted to the faculty office.

Discussion Groups:The class will be divided into discussion groups of 5 - 7 students. In this work group you will post a weekly short essay to discussion topics from the required reading that week. These essays will be a minimum of 400 words.

Weekly responses to essays in Discussion Groups: Within your Work Group you will also be required to make short responses to the short essays of 3 or more students in your group. These responses should be 100 words or less.

Research projects: One 5 page and one 8 page research paper complete with at least 5 bibliographic references is required.

Grades:
40%- Quality of weekly 400 word short essay papers posted in your work group.
20%- Quality of Responses in your work group.
40% 2 research papers, mid-term and final.

THE CLASSROOM EXPERIENCE

This on-line class is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, so you can work at your convenience. Students typically log on to this course four to five times per week to update new course material, post new discussion questions or research assignments and participation in threaded work group discussions. Instructors answer quetions, participate in discussions, and evaluate assignments. Instructors also update course content to insure discussions stay on topic.

Each student who enrolls will need to purchase 2 textbooks and will be sent Iinstructions for both browser log-on procedures to begin course. The course is primarily a writing and discussion group format with the instructor monitoring participation, directing discussions and supplying weekly discussion topics. Grading will be based on 16 short essay topics,8 long essay topics, students regular participation in threaded work group discussions, and 2 research papers.

The course will require the student to log-on to the University server four or five times a week to remain current with the course. Courseware design will archive and date all written material in two ways. One, by archiving all written material by individual student and two, by work groups. Archiving will allow both the student and faculty to quickly review both the quality and quantity of their participation.

WRITING REQUIREMENTS AND GUIDELINES

This is a writing course! The course will involve approximately 35 total pages of writing and 105 hours of work. It is estimated for every single written page the student will need to spend 3 hours of time: one hour reading material, one hour to write first draft and one hour to rewrite before the work is posted. These are general guidelines, but are offered to give students an understanding of the time commitment necessary for this 3 credit hour course.

Students will submit written documents on-line in three distinct areas: submission of weekly discussion topics in discussion groups, posting responses to topics in disscussion groups and writing two research papers posted to the research area.

1. Discussion topics posted weekly in Discussion Groups

The class will be divided into work groups of 4 - 6 students. In this work group you will post a weekly short essay to discussion topics from the required reading that week. These essays will be a minimum of 100 words (short) or 400 words (long) and must include 3 new terms from the text. These terms are extra requirements and do not have to relate to your essay. (16 short/long essays approx.15 pages)

2. Responses posted weekly in Discussion Groups

Within your Work Group you will be required to make short responses to the short essays of 3 or more students in your group. These responses should be 100 words or less.(24 responses total-approx. 8 pages)

3. Research papers submitted in Faculty Office or Research Library

Two research papers. The first paper will be a minimum of 8 pages long and is due at mid-term. The final research paper will be a minimum of 10 pages and is due at the end of the semester.(approx.15 total pages)

You will need to proof read your work for spelling and sentence structure. You can always type your answers in a word processing program and copy and paste into the courseware. If you can not write or type efficiently, this course is not for you. Grades will be determined by writing proficiency. Faculty must be able to understand your thoughts.

COMPUTER REQUIRMENTS FOR WEBCT?

Although almost any browser will work with WebCT, students seem to experience fewer problems when using Microsoft Internet Explorer or Netscape and Safari or Firefox with MAC. If you are an AOL user, you may find it easier to close the AOL browser after connecting, and use the recommended browser to log in to the course software. Go to http://www.enmu.edu/services/admissions/faqs/distance.shtml for more information

IS THIS COURSE FOR YOU

On-line learning courses require a high degree of commitment on the part of the student. There are no structured meeting times and no regular instructor contact. On-line learning means the student must be an independent and self-motivated learner. The role of the faculty is to observe the learning process of the students and participate when it is necessary.

On-line learning is not individualized instruction. The faculty expertise has been directed towards designing the best possible learning experience for the self-motivated. You will have access to your teachers for guidance and for specific questions. Use WebCT to contact your teacher - they are there for you - but be aware that your instructor only directs you towards the proper information to answer the questions yourself.

A calendar of deadlines and due dates has been established for this course. If you follow these dates closely, completing assignments and required readings, your level of success in this on-line course will increase. If you tend to wait to the last minute to complete projects, or prefer learning where there is face to face personal interaction, this will not be a good college level learning experience for you.

We want you to be successful. The faculty have gone to great lengths to design a course that is convenient, challenging and one in which you will learn more than in any land based course. If distance learning is right for your learning style and fits your needs, this is an exciting way to learn.

HOW TO SUCCEED

A key factor in ensuring your success is self-discipline. You will need to manage your time efficiently in order to complete the course in the allotted time. This is a writing intensive course and you will be writing the equivalent of 3-4 pages per week. We have found that those who are disciplined usually do very well. Learn to consider each discussion question with perceptive insight before responding. This will require that you read the assigned material and visit the www sites in making your preparations before posting your long and short essays.

We realize you will not have the advantage of face-to-face classroom discussions with peers and faculty, but the material included and the design of this course will help negate this problem. The short essay discussion questions asked in relationship to the readings, responses and visits to www sites will provide you with the breadth of knowledge necessary to understand the complexities of the history of photography.

TEXTBOOKS:

Seizing the Light: A History of Photography, by Robert Hirsch
Critizing Photographs, by Terry Barret

TIME TABLE, COURSE OUTLINE AND READINGS (actual dates subject to change)

MODULE ONE - Weeks 1 &2, Chapters 1 and 2
CH. 1-ADVANCING TOWARDS PHOTOGRAPHY: Camera obscura, work of Schulze,
Wedgewood, Niepce and Daguerre.
CH. 2-THE DAGUERREOTYPE: Plus the heliograph, travel views, portraits, American work - Brady,Southworth and Hawes.
Essay topics: Will be found online.
Short essays posted by midnight(EST) 9/3/07
Long essay posted in your group by midnight(EST) 9/7/07

MODULE TWO - Weeks 3 & 4, Chapters 3,4 and 5
CH. 3- CALOTYPE RISING: Talbot - The Pencil of Nature, Hershel, Hill and Adamson, Albumenpaper, Negre and Bayard.
CH. 4-PICTURES ON GLASS: Collodian process, Ambrotypes, tintypes, cartes-de-viste, Albumen plates, work of Nadar, Disderi,Sarony.
CH. 5-PREVAILING EVENTS: soft focus and allegorical work of Rejlander, Robinson & Cameron.
Essay topics: Will be found online.
Short essays posted by midnight(EST) 9/17/07
Long essay posted in your group by midnight(EST) 9/21/07

MODULE THREE - Weeks 5 & 6, Chapters 6 and 7
CH. 6-THE NEW MEDIUM OF COMMUNICATION: Fenton and Brady expeditionary work, Gardner,O'Sullivan, Jackson and Frith.
CH. 7-STANDARDIZING THE PRACTICE: Their history and development.
Essay topics: Will be found online.
Short essays posted by midnight(EST) 10/1/07
Long essay posted in your group by midnight(EST) 10/5/07

MODULE FOUR - Weeks 7 & 8, Chapters 8 and 9
CH. 8-NEW WAYS OF VISUALIZING TIME AND SPACE: Muybridge, Marey,Eakins, Eastman, Early motion pictures - Edison and Lumiere.
CH. 9-SUGGESTING THE SUBJECT: Emerson - Naturalistic Photography. Stieglitz - Secession and "291" Gallery.
Essay topics: Will be found online.
Short essays posted by midnight(EST) 10/15/07
Long essay posted in your group by midnight(EST) 10/19/07

MID-TERM research paper due: midnight(EST) 10/26/07
Your topic can be on anything on the history of photography. If you need ideas, refer to former short essay projects. You many use one of these, modify it or make up your own.(Minimum 5 pages of text) You must get instructors approval for your topics. Submit your topics for approval to the Faculty Office prior to starting your papers.

MODULE FIVE - Weeks 9 & 10, Chapters 10 and 11
CH. 10-MODERNISM: Stieglitz, Strand, Steeler, Steichen, Weston. Group f/64 Adams.
CH. 11-THE NEW CULTURE Work of Atget, Thomson, Riis, Hine and Sander, F.S.A. Project, Evans, Lange. Recent trends.
Essay topics: Will be found online.
Short essays posted by midnight(EST) 10/29/07
Long essay posted in your group by midnight(EST) 11/2/07

MODULE SIX - Weeks 11 & 12, Chapters 12 and 13
CH. 12-SOCIAL DOCUMENTS: Development of small cameras. Salomon, Brassai,Cartier-Bresson, Kertesz, Lartigue.
CH. 13-NABBING TIME: Abstractions, cameraless photos, distorted images, scientific work -Coburn, Man-Ray, Moholy-Nagy, Morgan.
Essay topics: Will be found online.
Short essays posted by midnight(EST) 11/12/07
Long essay posted in your group by midnight(EST) 11/16/07

MODULE SEVEN - Weeks 13 & 14, Chapters 14,15 and 16
CH. 14-PHOTOGRAPHY AND THE HALFTONE Picture magazines Salomon, Bourke-White, Smith,WeeGee, Capa, Miller, Burrows, Clark, Herron, Owens, Richards, Beard, Lyons, Meiselas.
CH. 15-THE ATOMIC AGE: Frank, White, Callahan,Caponigro,
CH. 16-NEW FRONTIERS: Art Sinsabaugh, Erwitt, Winogrand, Metzker,Gibson, Lyon
Essay topics: Will be found online.
Short essays posted by midnight(EST) 11/26/07
Long essay posted in your group by midnight(EST) 11/30/07

MODULE EIGHT - Weeks 15 & 16, Chapters 17 and 18
CH. 17-CHANGING REALITIES Klien, Davidson, Friedlander, Crane, Sheridan, Arbus, Uelsmann, Michaels, Decarava.
CH. 18-THINKING ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY Nettles, Barrow, Groover, Golden, Wegman, Baldessari, Sherman, Kruger, Cumming, Manual, Kasten, Witkin,
Essay topics: Will be found online.
Short essays posted by midnight(EST) 12/10/07
No Long essay


Final research paper due: Wednesday December 12, 2007 midnight EST
Your topic can be on anything from the history of photography. If you need ideas, refer to former projects. You many use one of these, modify it or make up your own. (Minimum 8 pages of text) You must get instructors approval for your topics. Submit your topics for approval to the Faculty Office prior to starting your papers.

Art Department  ENMU